Righting Reflection Writing

How do we get reflection right?  So that reflection is:

  • not seen as a chore
  • meaningful
  • celebratory, when appropriate
  • energizing for those reflecting
  • shared appropriately in the community.

We talked about blogs and reflection a lot at #beyondblogging this year up at #yis, and the big takeaway for me was actually a short comment made by a participant during one of the discussions: the class itself is most often that “authentic audience” we need for blogging.

So, in order for a reflective session to be successful, students need:

  • choice – what to reflect on, and how to share that reflection
  • an authentic audience, which is their peers, mostly.

A colleague and I used this presentation to help elicit student reflections.

 

Screen Shot 2017-06-27 at 17.21.08Screen Shot 2017-06-27 at 17.19.31

 

In my view, there were two key elements that facilitated this session’s success:

  • the verbal discussion with a partner, before each student documented their reflection, giving students the chance to clarify and prioritize their thoughts
  • the element of choice in how they reflected, although all reflections ended up on their blogs – a testament to the versatility of the blog as a medium.

 

 

Here are some of the results of student reflections that day.  This post is probably the highlight.  Interestingly linked in her blog, but not embedded.  Mental note for to do list.

What are some of your key ways to ensure reflection is meaningful, enjoyable and shared?

This slideshow requires JavaScript.

 

 

 

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About eadurkin

Originally a HS Mathematics teacher from New Zealand, currently working as Associate Principal in the Secondary School at Canadian Academy, an international school in Kobe, Japan. Married with two children.
This entry was posted in Blogs in the classroom, IB MYP, Uncategorized and tagged , , . Bookmark the permalink.

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